[MYANMAR] - The adventure in Yangon - Part II

We had a reasonably pleasure time in Yangon, as illustrated in the Yangon Part I. However, upon return from Bagan to Yangon, it has been a rather unpleasant trip. Partly being plagued by a severe diarrhea, allergies, vomit, lacking access to soft food and harassed by touts. Despite that, we still try to fully utilize the time here, dragging our partially impaired body wondering in this city.

Adventure in Yangon
Man on Yangon Street
We walked our ways from pharmary to another pharmacy, but the efforts were thwarted. Some of the pharmacists could not understand what we were trying to get, some even do not have any medications for diarrhea, which sounded rather unusual. Fortunately, we managed to get some loperamides from a bigger chain pharmacy, and at least the staff speaks English, but no luck with charcoal tables then.

The chaotic at Aung Mingalar bus station has started even in the early morning upon our arrival. It was about 6am then, but the bus station was like a busy morning market. Buses come and go, puddles of water on the floor, and people yelling here there to get people into their taxi. 

Feeling frustrated of getting endless touting from the taxi drivers. We simply settled with one of the taxi driver to get us to our hotel. In the end, he was simply making a fortune out of us as he had another passengers in the car going to a different destination. What a bad start for a day.

The day was still early when we reached hotel. Leveraging on this opportunity, we walked around the city only to discover some hidden wonders - the pigeons! 

Adventure in Yangon

Adventure in Yangon

Adventure in Yangon

We had never seen such vast amount of pigeons. They are everywhere, on the floor, in the sky. 

Adventure in Yangon

Adventure in Yangon

Adventure in Yangon

Morning Alms Rounds were a common scene in Yangon. People from different social and economic strata whom are faithful towards Buddhism waited in front of their houses to offer foods to the monks.

Adventure in Yangon

Adventure in Yangon

We thought of getting some foods from the local markets but the sanitary condition somehow put us off. The adventurous spirit embedded within us are buried here since the diarrhea. Let us be honest to each other, would you dare to buy the bread being put up in such condition? 

Adventure in Yangon

Adventure in Yangon

Haunting by the possibility of getting worsened food poisoning case, we went to the only place which we thought would serve a more hygienic food - Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC)! We were proud to be here, as this KFC restaurant is the only one in Yangon. Heard that the opening of KFC was such a festive back then.

Crispy and tender chicken set for 3700 kyat with the assurance of the hygiene and ease of mind. Despite the fact that suffering from diarrhea should not take oily food, we could not care much about it.

Adventure in Yangon

Adventure in Yangon

The lunch was done in a random restaurant nearby the city centre. Fried rice here was really good with the distinct scented rice grains. With a bowl of tomyam soup, total cost was 5000 kyat.

Adventure in Yangon

Adventure in Yangon

At night, the best place to hangout will be China town. The colonial buildings there offer a great place for street vendors food, souvenirs buying and beers. We intended to find a porridge stall here but it was no avail. 

Adventure in Yangon

Adventure in Yangon

Adventure in Yangon

Adventure in Yangon

Adventure in Yangon

Grill skewers are a popular food choices here. Take a basket and load anything you want into the basket, and you will be served shortly. Be mindful that the items are not cheap here, a skewer probably cost more than 1000 kyat. Nevertheless, some of the skewers really looked interesting and I was tempted to get them.

Adventure in Yangon

Adventure in Yangon

These few skewers cost me 5900 kyat, close to 4.5 USD. Probably I can have it for about 2-3 USD if I were in Malaysia. The taste was somehow disappointing too.

Adventure in Yangon

Had this sesame oil noodle at another stall for 3000 kyat. 

Adventure in Yangon

Exotic food also available here. 

Adventure in Yangon

We took this tau fu fa at a random stall and it tasted good with strong ginger taste and soft tau fu. 

Adventure in Yangon
Exterior of Bogyoke market
The ailment body did not deter us to go around Yangon, though we were pretty much limited by activities requiring strong physical activities. One decent place to go in such condition would be Bogyoke Aung San Market, located at Bogyoke Aung San road nearby the town center.

Depending on your shopping preference, you could either spend an hour to even half a day wandering in this market. Splash on a shopping spree here, pick up some clothes or a pair or new sandals, or pamper yourself with lavish jades.

Adventure in Yangon

Adventure in Yangon

If you are slightly adventurous, take a local ferry to the small township Dallah across Yangon river from Pansodan Road Jetty ( 11k kyat for return tickets, and appeared that foreigners need to pay more again). From Dallah, you can continue your adventure to Thante for some temple sightseeing by hiring a local bikes.

Adventure in Yangon

Adventure in Yangon

Interestingly, the ferry ride itself was a sightseeing. It was more like a local market to me, seeing people carrying all sort of food and things to the ferry and sell them. It is often over crowded and even to get a place for seating was difficult. Nevertheless, the problem will be solved if you have money because even there are special room designated to be sold for seating!

In contrast to Yangon, Dallah is a less developed township. Once you get down from the ferry, be prepared to mobbed by the locals, unrelenting harassing you to get you to their rides. Rumors that the local tri-shaw riders will try to make a fortune of you, either forcing you to pay more than what the agreed price or bring you to somewhere and forcing you to make donations.

Adventure in Yangon

So why still come to Dallah? Partly to see how the real Yangon people lives. Dallah looked like a slum to me, though not to the extent like Favela in Brazil. It is a good way to see how the locals live, and how they were depressed by the military junta regime.


Follow us for latest Crisp of Life updates at Facebook.
Check out Shirleen & Ee Pin's Instagram for more beautiful photos we have taken.

~End~

You Might Also Like

0 comments